Czech Republic

RegionCentral Europe
CapitalPrague
LanguageCzech
Population10,649,800
Expenditure on higher education1,6 %
Unemployment2,54 %
EuroUniversities in top 1001
EuroUniversities in top 2504
EuroUniversities in top 50015
EuroUniversities in top 100031
Students311,000
Foreigner students14,7 %
Enrollment rate in higher education68 %

The Czech Republic is a landlocked country in Central Europe bordered by Poland to the northeast, Slovakia to the southeast, Austria to the south, and Germany to the west. The tertiary education sector is divided into higher education (ISCED 645, 7, and 8) and tertiary professional education (ISCED 655). The term tertiary education is not defined in the present legislation but is used in official documents. Higher education and tertiary professional education applicants qualify for entry if they have completed secondary education with a Maturita examination (maturitní zkouška, ISCED 344 or 354) and meet the admission requirements stipulated by a relevant institution.

Higher education is realised at higher education institutions (vysoké školy), which form the highest level of the Czech education system. Higher education consists of three cycles:

  • Bachelor’s degree programme (ISCED 645), lasting 3–4 years;
  • Master’s degree programme (ISCED 7), lasting 1–3 years (ISCED 747), or 4–6 years in the case of programmes not following bachelor’s programmes – non-structured study programme (ISCED 746);
  • Doctoral degree programme (ISCED 844) lasting 3–4 years.

Higher education institutions are public, state, and private. Under the Higher Education Act, they are classified as university-type (24 public, two state, and three private) which offer study programmes at all three levels of higher education and non-university-type (two public and 38 private) which mainly offer Bachelor’s programmes but may also provide Master’s programmes.

Completed secondary education with a Maturita examination is the basic prerequisite for entry into Bachelor’s and non-structured Master’s programmes. Detailed admission requirements are set by a relevant higher education institution and usually include an entrance examination. Higher education can take forms of on-site courses, distance learning courses or a combination of both.

Students have to follow a study plan within an accredited degree programme; accreditation is awarded by the National Accreditation Bureau for Higher Education (Accreditation Bureau). Study programmes at higher education institutions cover almost all areas of science and arts. Each study programme is assigned to one of the 37 educational areas set by the Higher Education Act. Creation and provision of study programmes is one of the recognised academic rights and freedoms of higher education institutions, so their number and prevailing orientation changes in years.

Studies are duly completed if students obtain their qualification through:

  • a Bachelor’s degree programme which ends with the final state examination (státní závěrečná zkouška), part of which is usually the defence of a thesis, graduates are awarded the academic title Bachelor (Bc.), in the field of art, Bachelor of Arts (BcA.);
  • a Master’s degree programme which ends with the final state examination, part of which is the defence of a thesis, graduates mostly obtain the academic title Master (Mgr.) or Engineer (Ing.). Graduates who gained a Master´s degree (academic title Mgr.), obtain in case of additional advanced study examination (rigorózní zkouška) in the same study area, another academic title;
  • a Doctoral degree programme which ends with the state doctoral examination (státní doktorská zkouška), part of which is the defence of a thesis, graduates mostly obtain the academic title Doctor (Ph.D.).

As of 20 January 2016, the overall number of higher education students was 327 thousand. There were 194 thousand of students (58 %) in Bachelor’s degree programmes, 82 thousand (25 %) in the follow-up Master’s degree programmes, 32 thousand (10 %) in Long-cycle Master’s degree programmes and 24 thousand (7 %) in Doctoral degree programmes (on-site courses, distance learning courses or a combination of both is the basis for calculating the number of students). The sum of the number of Bachelor’s, Master’s, Long-cycle Master’s, and Doctoral degree students is higher than the total number of head counts. This is caused by the fact that some students are enrolled in several degree programmes. (Source: Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports.) 

Tertiary professional education (ISCED 655) is provided at tertiary professional schools (vyšší odborné školy). Tertiary professional schools are public, state, private or denominational.

Upper secondary education with a Maturita examination is the prerequisite for admission. Admission procedure details are set by the school head and can include an entrance examination. The courses usually include both a theoretical and a practical part. They can take a form of day form, evening, distance, or combined studies. The number of students in a study group is between 10 and 40 students. Educational programme is subject to accreditation from the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports that is awarded on the basis of a recommendation of the Accreditation Commission for Tertiary Professional Education.

Education ends with a graduate examination (absolutorium), an examination consisting of a theoretical part in vocational subjects, an exam in a foreign language and a defence of a thesis. Graduates obtain graduate examination certificates, a diploma and the title “specialist with a diploma“ (DiS.).

School-leavers from tertiary professional education do not have access to Master’s degree programmes (following Bachelor’s programmes). Some higher education institutions, however, offer the possibility to acknowledge the subjects studied within a tertiary professional school programme and thus enabling the school-leavers to complete a Bachelor’s degree programme in a shorter period of time.

Tertiary professional education in conservatoire (ISCED 554) is acquired through successful completion of a six-year or eight-year educational programme. The studies proceed continuously involving also secondary level of education. Pupils can also receive upper secondary education with a Maturita examination (ISCED 354).

Individual types of higher education programmes are described in following parts: Bachelor’s Degree ProgrammesSecond Cycle Programmes (Master’s degree programmes), Master’ s non-structured study programmes and Third Cycle (PhD) Programmes (Doctoral degree programmes).

Education at tertiary professional schools is described in Chapter 7 on Tertiary professional schools, education at conservatoires due to the nature of the study in Chapter 6 on Upper Secondary and Post-Secondary Non-Tertiary Education.

Administration and governance of tertiary education at national, regional, local and institutional level is provided separately in Chapter 2 on Organisation and Governance. Section Organisation of Private Education of Chapter 2 deals with information on private higher education institutions and tertiary professional schools.

Legislation and Bibliography:

Education Act

Higher Education Act

General objectives

Higher education institutions (vysoké školy) are supreme centres of education, independent knowledge and creative activity. The general goal of higher education is to provide students with adequate professional qualifications, prepare them for engagement in research and participating in lifelong learning, make them contribute to the development of civic society and international, particularly European cooperation. They attain this goal by linking instruction with scholarly, research, developmental, artistic and other creative activities. 

The Higher Education Act oblige the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports to issue, annually update and publish the Strategic Plan of the Ministry. Currently valid document is the Strategic Plan for the Scholarly, Scientific, Research, Development, Innovation, Artistic and Other Creative Activities of Higher Education Institution for 2016–2020. The priority goals of the higher education policy encompass assuring quality, diversity and accessibility, internationalisation, relevance, quality and relevant research, development and innovation, decision making based on data and effective financing. For more information.

Tertiary professional education (vyšší odborná škola) develops and promotes knowledge and skills students acquired in secondary education and provides general education and vocational training for them to perform demanding professional activities. It is understood to be professional training. 

In line with the School Education Act, the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports issues the Long-term Plan for Education and the Development of the Education System of the Czech Republic. The long-term plan sets plans, goals and criteria for the education policy at the education levels from the pre-primary up to the tertiary professional level. For the period 2015–2020, it is aimed mainly at equal opportunities in education with the emphasis on guidance and education of pupils with special educational needs. Another main goal is to make the assessment of pupils, the schools and the school system more effective and to improve the conditions of the education staff. The main task for the area of tertiary professional education in the period 2015-2020 will be to discuss with the representatives of the academic community the alternatives for the further development of tertiary professional education in the education system and to link the activities of the Accreditation Commission for Higher Vocational Education with the procedure for registration of the accredited field of education in the School Register.

Legislation and Bibliography:

Education Act

Higher Education Act

Long-term Plan for Education and the Development of the Education System of the Czech Republic (2015–2020)

Strategic Plan for the Scholarly, Scientific, Research, Development, Innovation, Artistic and Other Creative Activities of Higher Education Institutions (2016–2020)

Legislative framework

Tertiary education field is regulated by two laws:

  • Higher Education Act
  • Education Act, which regulates tertiary professional education in one part and in another one regulates education in conservatoires

Higher education institutions

The Higher Education Act of 1998 (with more than twenty amendments) sets forth the mission of higher education institutions (vysoké školy), the academic community and academic freedom. It defines the position of public, state and private higher education institutions, their bodies or structure; for public schools it sets out rules for asset management. It establishes basic framework for the funding of higher education institutions. It also describes types of study programmes, accreditation rules and bodies, conditions under which an institution applying for the status of a private higher education institution can gain state approval. It regulates admission to a study programme, its course and completion, sets out the rules and duties for students and the policy for awarding academic titles. It regulates the position of academic staff and the relationship between higher education institutions and the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports. Furthermore, it regulates recognition of qualifications and their parts acquired abroad. In a supplement to this Act, public and state higher education institutions are listed in detail and due the adoption of the last amendment to the Higher Education Act also educational areas for which the higher education institution can acquire an institutional accreditation. The amendment to the Higher Education Act was approved in April 2016 and came into force on 1 September 2016. The amendment is extensive introducing e.g. new rules for accreditation, including establishment of the National Accreditation Bureau for Higher Education (Accreditation Bureau), and a new system of quality evaluation of higher education institutions. It stipulates several matters concerning the structure of higher education, e.g. it newly introduces profiles of the Bachelor´s and Master´s Degree Programmes, educational areas etc., organisation of the higher education institutions, changes some of the details of the admission procedure, and to certain extent also personnel matters, changes the conditions for the functioning of foreign higher education institutions and their branches in the Czech Republic. 

Activities of higher education institutions are also governed by their internal regulations that follow on from the Higher Education Act and are subject of registration to the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports. For each higher education institution, ten internal regulations are mandatory and further regulations may be required by the school’s statutes.

Some aspects of higher education are regulated in more detail by implementing rules:

  • Government Regulation on the Educational Areas in Higher Education
  • Government Regulation on the Accreditation Standards in Higher Education
  • Decree on Procedure and Conditions for Publishing Details about Admission Proceedings at Higher Education Institutions
  • Decree on Submitting Statistical Data by Higher Education Institutions
  • Decree on Submitting Data to the Register for Managing the Applications for Recognition of Foreign Higher Education and Qualifications
  • Decree on Submitting Data to the Registry of Associate Professors, Professors and Distinguished Professors

Tertiary professional schools

The Education Act defines the goal and the level of tertiary professional education, its organisation and admission requirements, course and completion of study programmes, attained qualification and the manner in which accreditation of study programmes is granted.

Further particulars about types of tertiary professional schools (vyšší odborné školy), organisation of study, course of study and its completion, tuition and accreditation of study programmes are specified by a Decree on Tertiary Professional Education. The system of tertiary professional education courses is governed by a government regulation.

Legislation and Bibliography:

Decree on Procedure and Conditions of Publication of Results of Admission Procedure at Higher Education Institutions

Decree on Submitting Data to the Register for Managing the Applications for Recognition of Foreign Higher Education and Qualifications

Decree on Submitting Data to the Registry of Associate Professors, Professors and Distinguished Professors

Decree on Submitting Statistical Data by Higher Education Institutions

Decree on Tertiary Professional Education

Education Act

Government Regulation on the Accreditation Standards in Higher Education

Government Regulation on the Educational Areas in Higher Education

Government Regulation on the System of Fields of Studies in Basic, Upper Secondary and Tertiary Professional Education

Higher Education Act

Organisation of the school and academic year

Organisation of studies differs between tertiary professional schools (vyšší odborné školy) and higher education institutions (vysoké školy).

Higher education institutions

Higher education can take forms of on-site courses, distance learning courses or a combination of both. The academic year lasts 12 months; the beginning is set by the Rector (rektor) usually for September or October. Studies are usually split into semesters, years or teaching blocks which cover periods of teaching activity, examinations and holidays. Most commonly, the academic year is split into semesters which have 14 weeks of teaching activity followed by a period of examinations. Summer holidays are in July and August, usually followed by an extended period of examinations. Details are stipulated in internal regulations of a relevant institution.

Tertiary professional schools

The school year starts on 1 September and ends on 31 August covering the period of instruction and a summer holiday. The teaching activity period lasts 40 weeks (32 hours of instruction, 6 hours of self-study and assessment and 2 weeks of time reserve) and is split into a winter term (1 September to 31 January) and a summer term (1 February to 31 August). The last period of the educational programme instruction lasts at least 14 weeks. During a summer holiday, schools can offer compulsory courses, professional practice, or examinations, however, students should have at least 4 weeks of free time. Details on organisation of the school year are set by the school head in accordance with the accredited programme of study.

Legislation and Bibliography:

Decree on Organisation of School Year

Decree on Tertiary Professional Education

Education Act

Higher Education Act

Bachelor

Study programmes

Bachelor’s degree programmes (ISCED 645) are intended to provide qualifications for performing a profession as well as for continuing in a Master’s degree programme

The standard length of studies including practical training is no less than three and no more than four years. One standard academic year corresponds to 60 ECTS. The overwhelming majority of programmes takes three years (180 ECTS). Four-year study programmes (240 ECTS) exist in some technical fields, building industry or fine art.

In the supplement of the Higher Education Act, the 37 of so called educational areas are set. It is the factually defined section of higher education where the study programmes of close or related content focus reflecting common theoretical and methodological basis of the particular educational area are being prepared, approved and realized.

Creation and provision of degree programmes belong to the recognised academic rights and freedoms of higher education institutions (vysoké školy). The study programme is subject to accreditation, which is awarded by the National Accreditation Bureau for Higher Education (Accreditation Bureau). In case, the Accreditation Bureau gives the higher education institution institutional accreditation for the particular educational area/areas, the higher education institution approves itself study programmes in an internal process. Study programmes approved by the higher education institution are considered as accredited according to the Higher Education Act. Newly, accredited/approved study programmes are not broken down into study fields. All study programmes, which were accredited as of 31 August 2016 (before the amendment No. 137/2016 Coll. came into force) stay valid for the whole period for which their accreditation has been awarded, at minimum until 1 September 2019, and in its original structure given by the accreditation (including study fields).

The study programme includes:

  1. name of the study programme, its type, form and aims of study; in the case of Bachelor’s or Master’s study programme also the information on the profile of the study programme
  2. determination of the graduates’ profile
  3. characteristics of the subjects of study
  4. rules and conditions for establishing study plans and possibly also the length of practical experience, which could also be carried out with other natural or legal person
  5. standard length of study within the average study work load
  6. conditions to be met by the student during in the course of the study programme and its successful completion 
  7. the awarded academic title 
  8. specification of educational area/areas the study programme is to be implemented in

Profile of the Bachelor’s or Master’s study programme can be:

  1. professionally oriented with an emphasis on mastering practical skills necessary for performing a profession based on necessary theoretical knowledge or;
  2. academically oriented with an emphasis on gaining theoretical knowledge necessary for performing a profession including its use in creative activity, and providing also the space for acquiring necessary practical skills. 

Substantial attention is paid to the development of other than onsite forms of higher education studies. Almost all higher education institutions offer degree programmes in a form combining onsite and distance study (so called combined form of study) in all three cycles of higher education. As of October 2018 there were only three study programmes purely based on distance learning: Bachelor’s study programme “Applied mathematics” at the University of Ostrava (Ostravská univerzita), and two Master’s degree programmes – “Business Informatics” and “Business administration and management” at the University of Economics Prague (Vysoká škola ekonomická v Praze). The establishment of so-called open universities is not considered.

Public higher education institutions can provide degree programmes in co-operation with other higher education institutions or tertiary professional schools (vyšší odborné školy). In 2016, public higher education institutions offered 103 degree programmes organised jointly with other higher education institutions or research institution in the Czech Republic. In 2016, public higher education institutions organised 6 degree programmes in cooperation with a tertiary professional school.

Legislation and Bibliography:

Higher Education Act

Admission requirements

Secondary education completed with a Maturita examination (maturitní zkouška, ISCED 344 or 354), confirmed by a Maturita examination certificate (vysvědčení o maturitní zkoušce) is the fundamental requirement for entering a Bachelor’s degree programme. For fine arts degrees, applicants who have gained their graduate diploma (diplom absolventa konzervatoře) from a conservatoire (konzervatoře) may be admitted as well (they need not have the Maturita examination – maturitní zkouška). In special cases also students without graduate diploma in conservatoire or having completed secondary education with a Maturita examination may be admitted.

A higher education institution (vysoká škola) or a faculty can set other conditions of the admission requirements concerning certain knowledge, competencies or talents or the achievement in the previous required education. By the amendment to the 2004 Higher Education Act, a higher education institution or a faculty may set different conditions for admission not only of applicants who have completed a study programme or its part at a higher education institution – domestic or foreign, but also of applicants who have completed an accredited educational programme or its part in a tertiary professional school or who are studying an accredited educational programme in a tertiary professional school in the Czech Republic or a corresponding institution abroad. This amendment was intended to improve transition in the tertiary education sector, especially in transition whether from a tertiary professional school, higher education institution or a faculty/field.

The 2016 Amendment stipulates also the conditions for applicants who acquired foreign upper secondary education. The higher education institution which obtained the institutional accreditation and has no doubts on the quality of the upper secondary school, can recognise the completed upper secondary education confirmed by:

  • a certificate recognising the equivalence of a foreign certificate;
  • the certificate of European baccalaureate;
  • a foreign certificate on foreign upper secondary education, if it is, according to international agreements, equivalent without further proceedings;
  • a foreign certificate on foreign upper secondary education in upper secondary educational programme entitling to enter Bachelor’s or Master’s study programme in a country in which the studies were completed. 

When necessary, the higher education institution can ask for further information. 

Recognition of achievements of previous formal, non-formal and informal education is not set down in a systematic way, no standards and requirements for procedures in recognition of previous education achievements in relation to the quality of study were determined.

In general, admission to studies at higher educational institutions is limited primarily by the capacity of each institution. The number of students at public higher education institutions which will be funded in the academic year is limited at the central level by the amount of money allocated to the school through formula funding. A particular higher education institution decides on the number of students in individual fields and forms of study. Since 2010, the changes in financing of higher education institutions have been in progress with the aim to limit number of enrolled students step by step as due to the demographic decrease, the number of enrolled students would increase considerably in comparison to the population cohort.

Choice of HEI

An applicant is free to choose any higher education institution. Admission to a specific programme is dependent on the student’s achievement in the admission proceedings and is limited by local conditions and the number of places in some fields.

People may apply for admission to several degree programmes (or to several study fields in one study programme) at one faculty or a higher education institution or at several faculties or higher education institutions at the same time; The Higher Education Act makes it possible to study on more than one programme at more than one higher education institution either in parallel or successively. 

Students need not go on to higher education immediately on completing their secondary schooling. There is no legal age limit for commencing higher education studies.

Criteria

An entrance examination can be part of admission proceedings at higher education institutions; it helps to select the ablest applicants and to establish a list determining the order in which they are to be admitted depending on conditions set in advance. The content and the form of the examination are entirely upon responsibility of the relevant higher education institution. It normally consists of written examinations (tests) that aim to assess the applicant’s knowledge. Tests of study skills (student’s abilities – e.g. verbal thinking, analytical thinking, and spatial visualisation ability) may also be included; exceptionally, tests of study prerequisites are the only criterion for admission. Some higher education institutions organise admission interviews with applicants. Some higher education institutions use average results of the previous study as a criterion for admission. Due to the decreasing number of students in upper secondary schools, some higher education institutions are beginning to feel student shortage in certain fields of study (e.g. in some technically oriented fields), thus passing the upper secondary Maturita examination is sufficient for admission.

Tests of artistic talent are used by higher education institutions, usually for admission to performing and fine arts programmes and for primary school teacher training. They help to determine the applicant’s artistic talent. Talent examinations usually precede examinations in theory.

In case the nature of the study programme requires it, a precondition for admission to studies can also be medical fitness of the applicant. In such case, the higher education institution or the faculty publishes requirements on medical fitness for the particular study programme in the announcement of the admission procedure. 

Decisions on admission

A report on the result of the admission proceedings is made public within 15 days of the final day of the proceedings. If an admission examination is included, basic statistics related to all its parts are released. Decisions on admission or non-admission must be issued within 30 days and delivered to the applicant, possibly via the electronic information system of the higher education institution (the applicant has to give consent to such delivery). If the decision is not successfully delivered, it is delivered by public notice. If a course is offered by a faculty, the dean decides on admission. If it is taught at a university, the decision is upon the rector. A decision on non-admission may be appealed against within a set time limit. If a dean refuses the appeal, the rector may change a decision that was issued in conflict with the law, with an internal regulation of the institution or with conditions set by the university or the faculty itself. At private higher education institutions, admission is decided on by a body which is established and based on internal regulations. 

Enrolment

When applicants are accepted for a degree programme, they have the right to be enrolled in the institution. On the day of enrolment, the applicant becomes a student.

Legislation and Bibliography:

Higher Education Act

Curriculum

Deciding about the content of studies and the design of degree programmes is one of the academic freedoms of higher education institutions (vysoké školy) in the Czech Republic. There are only general provisions concerning study programmes contained in Articles 44-27 of the Higher Education Act. However, all study programmes are subject to accreditation which is granted by the National Accreditation Bureau for Higher Education (Accreditation Bureau) or the programmes in the areas for which the higher education institutions acquired institutional accreditation are approved by the higher education institutions themselves. For both the accreditation of a study programme and the institutional accreditation, a higher education institution is obliged to complete and submit a written and by law specified application for which general minimum requirements including the focus of the study programme content exist. Conditions to be met by students during their studies and upon the regular completion of them are determined in the curriculum, according to the study and examination regulations, and further by the content and scope of the final state examinations.

Curriculum

Curriculum (studijní plán) is part of the application for accreditation. The basis of individual subjects is formed by a list of compulsory references. For compulsory subjects and those which are compulsorily optional, a short summary is required to define objectives of the courses, their specialisation – that is, in the terminology of the Bologna process, learning outcomes. Rules for inclusion of study subjects or their parts into the curriculum are required in terms of their content and chronological succession or methods and conditions of study control according to the curriculum. For the professionally oriented Bachelor’s degree programme (for academically oriented profile as needed), it is necessary to meet the prescribed scope of professional practice in the on-site form of study. 

Study in a foreign language

All study programmes include study of one or more foreign languages (in case of structured study mostly in the framework of the Bachelor’s study programme).

If the conditions are favourable (e.g. a foreign teacher is available), the instruction of some subjects may be conducted in a foreign language.

At several faculties (e.g. medicine, but not only there), foreign students may, for a certain fee, undergo entire studies in a foreign language. The list of these programmes is available at the website Study in. Individual higher education institutions make their offer of accredited programmes in a foreign language public on their websites.

One-year courses of Czech are offered to foreign students who express their interest in studying in Czech language before commencement of their studies.

Legislation and Bibliography:

Catalogue of Higher Education Institutions in the Czech Republic

The Education System of the Czech Republic

Guide to Studying and Living in the Czech Republic

Higher Education Act

Teaching methods

Teaching is realised through the form of:

  • lectures
  • seminars
  • exercises
  • laboratory work
  • practice (e.g. clinical practice of medical students, teaching observation of student-teachers in schools etc.)

Attendance at lectures and other forms of teaching is determined by the higher education institution (vysoká škola) itself. Participation in seminars is usually obligatory.

The fact that most higher education institutions (including halls of residence) are equipped with computer technology makes it possible for students to opt for self-study, working independently with information, study materials, laboratories and computer technology.

Due to autonomy of higher education institutions, they have free choice of teaching aids and equipment in accordance with their budget capacity. Higher education institutions present space, information and equipment assurance of the degree programme and the basic study literature and aids of individual subjects in the application for accreditation.

Legislation and Bibliography:

Higher Education Act

Progression of students

Students may be enrolled in a higher year of a higher education institution (vysoká škola) after passing the prescribed examinations, possibly other types of study assessment (hereafter only examinations) or after achieving the prescribed number of credits.

In case of failure, the study and examination regulations of a higher education institution allow for exams to be retaken as well as whole years can be repeated. However, this means that the student usually loses time, which has financial consequences (if the standard length of studies is exceeded by more than one year, the student becomes liable for fees. Student older than 26 also loses certain social advantages such as a scholarship or social allowances or a higher education institution may decide to abolish the right for accommodation in a hall of residence etc.

Students can choose to interrupt their studies on terms set by study and examination regulations which define the longest possible period for interruption of the study.

Generally, higher education institutions set so-called “maximum length of study in a degree programme” (e.g. at Charles University, it is the standard length of study programme plus 3 years).

If students discover that the choice of a study programme or a study field does not suit them, they may transfer to another study programme or study field at the same faculty or higher education institution or at another faculty or higher education institution. If a part of the study programme he /she has already completed is sufficiently compatible with the newly chosen study field, the results achieved are counted either in the original programme or in the new field or programme. If this is not the case, it is recommended that they bridge the gap by taking special examinations for transferring among courses. Transfers from one study programme or study field to another or from one institution to another are also possible if the student later finds out that he / she does not have sufficient knowledge or abilities to master the programme or the field of study originally chosen. Recognition of the previous study depends on the accepting institution. The previous study length is counted in the standard study length of the new study programme or the study field. This is important especially for calculation of fees when a student exceeds the standard length by more than one year.

A change of a programme or a field of study during the course of studies is possible. However, there is an effort to prevent this by ensuring that students choose an appropriate programme or a field of study. Different types of guidance and counselling services are set to prevent the student turnover from one programme or field to the another programme or field. Preparatory courses also help to avoid students changing their study programme or field.

Legislation and Bibliography:

Higher Education Act

Employability

Higher education institutions (vysoké školy) are highly autonomous in setting the content of their courses.

According to Government Regulation on the Accreditation Standards in Higher Education, in the case of professionally oriented Bachelor’s programmes, the higher education institution (vysoká škola) are required to manifest cooperation with practice. The study programme is drawn up to enable the students to manage practical skills needed for the profession. The study plan of the professionally oriented programme shall include practice in the length of at least 12 weeks.

Otherwise, the HE legislation does not set any specific rules for work placements and practical training. Although, in case of regulated professions (presented in Communication to Directive 2005/36/EC; see also Database of Regulated Professions), some programmes might be influenced by other legislature.

The Government is not allowed to oblige HEIs to include certain forms of education in their programmes but it can support them namely by financial incentives. In this respect, HEIs are recommended to develop a system supporting work placements for students to improve the employability of graduates and increase the relevance of tertiary education. 

Employers should be members of Board of Trustees of public HEIs as according to the Higher Education Act the representatives of public life, professional associations, employer´s organisations or other persons or bodies performing, supporting or taking advantage of educational or creative activities of higher education institutions or their results, representatives of municipality as well as state administration and graduates of the particular institution should be adequately represented. At least one third of the members of the Scientific Board of public HEIs or their faculty must be from outside the academic community of the particular higher education institution. Therefore, employers can be the members also of the Scientific Board. One of the tasks of the Scientific Board is to approve degree programmes of the HEI. The representation of these members in the above Boards is not common, but is much more usual in technically oriented HEIs. 

Information for students in looking for a job is offered by e.g. career centres established at individual higher education institutions, there are many websites on the internet with links to jobs or internships.

Reports on employability are carried out in the Education Policy Centre, Faculty of Education, Charles University in Prague (Středisko vzdělávací politiky Pedagogické fakulty Univerzity Karlovy (SVP PedF UK)), which deals with the overall situation and the status of tertiary/higher education in the labour market in the Czech Republic and other developed countries in terms of economic activity and employment/unemployment, wage levels, participation in individual economic sectors and occupational groups, demand for tertiary education by employers, etc.

The database created by the SVP should provide different target groups with access to information on unemployed graduates. A user can create various sets and comparisons concerning continuation of studies and employability of graduates with regard to the different time span after completing the study. There are specific data on unemployment of graduates of particular higher education institutions and faculties included.

The SVP is also the coordinator of the project REFLEX 2013: Employability and prospects of graduates in the labour market and the evaluation of acquired higher education, which follows similar international projects carried out in the research of university graduates employability conducted in previous years.

The SVP prepares annual reports on the position and employability of higher education graduates.

Unemployment rate of Bachelor’s degree graduates at all public higher education institutions in the Czech Republic, 2005–2018 (data collection in April of the given year)

 20052006200720082009201020112012201320142015201620172018
0–12 month9.38.56.74.86.28.58.47.311.010.48.38.04.93.8
12–24 month3.53.32.62.02.62.93.12.34.03.73.73.22.62.7

Source: Database of the SVP PedF UK – data extracted on 31 December 2018

Legislation and Bibliography:

Communication of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports (SK23/2015) of 11. 8. 2015, Issuing the List of Regulated Professions in the Czech Republic (2015)

Database of the SVP PedF UK

Directive 2005/36/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council on the Recognition of Professional Qualifications

Government Regulation on the Accreditation Standards in Higher Education

Higher Education Act 

Strategic Plan for the Scholarly, Scientific, Research, Development, Innovation, Artistic and Other Creative Activities of Higher Education Institutions (2016–2020)

Student assessment

Study outcomes at higher education institutions (vysoké školy) are assessed mainly by a system of credits. All public higher education institutions and most private higher education institutions have implemented the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS) or a system compatible with ECTS. Between 2009–2011 ECTS Label certificates and DS Label certificates were granted to higher education institutions (the awarding has been ceased with the end of the Bologna Experts Project).

Organisation of examinations is legally embedded in study and examination regulations (studijní řád and zkušební řád), which are part of internal regulations of a higher education institution and are approved by the academic senate. Results of the assessment are recorded in a report on studies (výkaz o studiu) and can also be provided by the electronic information system of the higher education institution or faculty.

Assessing study results

Usual forms of assessing study results:

  • monitoring the study of a subject
  • continuous assessment of study
  • equivalency test
  • comprehensive examination
  • state examination or its part

Monitoring the study of a subject

Successful completion of the courses is usually monitored in the form of:

  • colloquium
  • credit
  • final examination project
  • examination
  • combination of all of these

The frequency and methods of assessing students’ achievements differ among higher education institutions and faculties. In some cases, a system of partial examinations taken after each semester has been introduced, in other cases there is one comprehensive examination after each completed part of the studies – most often at the end of a certain module. Higher education institutions offering arts programmes use students’ exhibitions, musical performances etc. as a basis for assessment. In both cases, however, considerable emphasis is also placed on continuous assessment of the students’ work, mostly in the form of tests of knowledge or independent work (on computers, graphic work, laboratory work or seminar work) or independent artistic work.

In general, examinations are taken during an examination period at the end of each semester. Examiners are the teachers of individual subjects. The relevant examiners set dates of individual examinations and the dates of all examinations are announced by the management of the institution (faculty). In some cases, it is possible to take an examination before the agreed official date. A failed exam may be retaken several times.

Final examinations are taken in front of boards of examiners. In order to increase the level of objectivity, external examiners from other higher education institutions or scientific establishments are invited to sit on the boards and the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports can also appoint other significant specialists in the given field to the examination boards. Special care is taken to authorise only the most qualified academic staff.

The Bachelor’s thesis, if prescribed, is part of the final state examination.

Legislation and Bibliography:

Higher Education Act

Certification

A Bachelor’s degree programme generally finishes with a final state examination (státní závěrečná zkouška), which usually includes defence of a Bachelor’s thesis (bakalářská práce). Studies are considered to be completed on the day when the last part of a state examination is taken.

higher education diploma (vysokoškolský diplom) and a supplement to the diploma (dodatek k diplomu) are documents confirming completion of studiesand the right to use the appropriate academic title. The level of educational attainment is ISCED 645. Higher education institutions have the right to award a higher education qualification (diploma) only in accredited degree programmes (Bachelor’s, Master’s and doctoral). Accreditation to a particular higher education institution is granted by the independent National Accreditation Bureau for Higher Education (Accreditation Bureau) either in the form of institutional accreditation for an educational area or for a particular study programme. On the basis of the institutional accreditation for an educational area, the higher education institution obtains a permission to approve its study programme within this educational area. For more information, Accreditation and external evaluation in Chapter 11.

An overview of higher education diplomas in Bachelor’s degree programmes

ProgrammesTitleAbbreviation
most programmesbakalář (Bachelor) Bc.
in art 1)bakalář umění (Bachelor of Art)BcA.

1) For graduates of degree programmes in arts who were admitted without having completed upper secondary education with a Maturita examination, the title is awarded after they have attained upper secondary education with a Maturita examination or tertiary professional education in a conservatoire.

Note: Both titles are used before the name.

Successful completion of the Bachelor’s degree programme is a prerequisite for admission to a Master’s degree programme.

Recognition of qualifications

Regional Authorities are competent bodies in assessing a qualification that enables access to higher education. Newly, the foreign certificate on completing upper secondary education for the purpose of admission to study can also be recognized by a higher education institution with institutional accreditation for at least one educational area. At the same time the higher education institution has no doubts about the sufficiency of the level, scope or content of the previous foreign education of the applicant, supported by a foreign certificate (Section 48, paragraph 6 of the Higher Education Act). For more information. The higher education institution can set a fee for the activities connected to the document appraisal.

The Convention on Recognition of Qualifications concerning Higher Education in the European Region is the guiding document on recognition of higher education degrees. While submitting the request for recognition of the foreign higher education and qualification according to the Section 89, the applicant shall has to pay a fee (Section 90a of the Higher Education Act). The Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports is administering a Register for managing the recognition of foreign higher education and qualification according to the Section 89, which is an information system of the public administration (Section 90b of the Higher Education Act). Public higher education institutions carrying out, as for the content of the study, similar study programmes are competent bodies for recognition of higher education or its part. The Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports can issue a decision on recognition of the study or its part if this is authorised by a contract between the Czech Republic and the country where the foreign higher education institution is established and recognised. In other cases, it is the public higher education institution that provides a similar study programme in respect of its content which issues the decision. When in doubt, the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports decides about the appropriate public higher education institution or makes the decision itself. For more information.

Important services, particularly in terms of information and guidance, are provided by the Czech ENIC-NARIC operating within the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports, which is part of the European networks of information centres ENIC and centres NARIC.

Legislation and Bibliography:

Decree on Equivalence and Validity of Foreign Certificates Issued by Foreign Schools

Decree on Submitting Data to the Register for Managing the Applications for Recognition of Foreign Higher Education and Qualification

Education Act

Higher Education Act

The Statement of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs on Acceptance of the Convention on the Recognition of Qualifications concerning Higher Education in the European Region

Second Cycle Programmes

Study programmes

Master’s degree programmes are intended to promote the acquisition of theoretical knowledge based on current scientific and scholarly knowledge, research and development and to lead students to apply this knowledge and develop their creative facilities. In the area of fine arts, they are designed to provide demanding artistic training and encourage the development of students’ talents.

Most higher education institutions (vysoké školy) have already implemented the three-cycle system structure. Thus Master’s degree programmes follow on from Bachelor’s degree programmes (ISCED 747); the standard length of such a programme is no less than one and no more than three years. One standard academic year corresponds to 60 ETCS credits. Most Master’s degree programmes last two years (120 ECTS).

When the nature of the study requires it, traditional non-structured Master‘s programme (ISCED 746) are used. In such a case, the standard length of study is no less than four and no more than six years (usually five years, six years in the case of e.g. general medicine). Within the non-structured Master´s programmes especially the study of medicine, law, primary teacher training, etc. is carried out. These programmes are described in Master’s non-structured study programmes.

Creation and offer of degree programmes belong to recognised academic rights and freedoms of higher education institutions. The degree programme is subject to accreditation awarded by the National Accreditation Bureau for Higher Education (Accreditation Bureau) or is approved by the higher education institution itself in its internal process, if it obtains institutional accreditation for the relevant area (s) of education. The study programmes approved by the higher education institutions are considered accredited according to the Higher Education Act. They are no longer broken down to the fields of study. Degree programmes can take forms of on-site courses, distance learning courses or a combination of both. The combined form is common; the distance-learning form is accredited only at two higher education institutions in three fields (for more.

Legislation and Bibliography:

Higher Education Act

Admission requirements

Successful completion of any programme, i.e. especially of a Bachelor‘s degree programme (ISCED 645) but also Master´s degree programme including the non-structured one (ISCED 747 or 746) as well as doctoral degree programme (ISCED 844) is the condition for admission to a Master‘s degree programme following on from a Bachelor’s degree programme. In some cases, though, a higher education institution (vysoká škola) may also set further conditions relating to particular study fields or a number of credits gained in certain subjects, a higher education institution can e.g. lay down a duty on students to pass some basic subjects that they had not passed in their previous study in the Bachelor’s programme.

Admission may be subject only to the applicants’ meeting of the predefined requirements.

An entrance examination can be part of an admission proceeding to a Master’s degree programme. The content and the form of the examination are entirely upon the responsibility of the relevant higher education institution.

Restrictions in the number of students and the admission process are similar to the Bachelor’s programme. The general principles are the same.

For information on tuition fees and other payments.

Legislation and Bibliography:

Higher Education Act

Curriculum

General principles are the same as for Bachelor’s degree programmes.

In the Government regulation on the accreditation standards in higher education, it is explicitly stated for the content of education in Master’s degree programmes: “The content of a Master’s degree programme is based on the contemporary state of scientific knowledge and creative activity in the particular educational area.”

Legislation and Bibliography:

Higher Education Act

Government Regulation on the Accreditation Standards in Higher Education

Teaching methods

General principles are the same as for Bachelor’s degree programmes.

Progression of students

General principles are the same as for a Bachelor’s degree programme. Further conditions are included in Study and Examination Regulations of higher education institutions (vysoké školy) or faculties. A maximum period of study is embedded in internal regulations of higher education institutions (at Charles University, it is the standard length plus 3 years).

Legislation and Bibliography:

Higher Education Act

Employability

Higher education institutions (vysoké školy) are highly autonomous in setting the content of their courses. According to Government Regulation on the Accreditation Standards in Higher Education, in the case of professionally oriented Master’s study programmes, the higher education institutions are required to manifest cooperation with practice and the study programme is drawn up to enable the students to manage practical skills needed for the profession. The study plan of the professionally oriented programme shall include practice in the length of at least 6 weeks. The non-structured version of professionally oriented Master’s study programmes shall include practice of at least 18 weeks.

The Government is not allowed to oblige HEIs to include certain forms of education in their programmes but it can support them namely by financial incentives

The general principles are the same as for a Bachelor’s degree programme.

The database of the Education Policy Centre, Charles University in Prague (Středisko vzdělávací politiky Pedagogické fakulty Univerzity Karlovy (SVP PedF UK)) mentioned enables to determine what percentage of graduates follows on to Doctoral programmes and what the employability of graduates is. The following data cover Master’s programme graduates of all Master’s degree programmes including Master’s non-structured degree programmes.

Unemployment rate of Master’s study graduates of all public higher education institutions in the Czech Republic, 2005–2018 (data collection in April of the given year)

 20052006200720082009201020112012201320142015201620172018
0–12 months5.54.53.42.93.55.56.24.26.46.15.44.53.02.0
12–24 months2.11.61.31.11.61.71.71.21.71.71.71.71.31.0

Source: Database of the SVP PedF UK – data extracted on 13 December2018

Legislation and Bibliography:

Communication of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports (SK23/2015) of 11. 8. 2015, Issuing the List of Regulated Professions in the Czech Republic (2015)

Database of the SVP PedF UK

Directive 2005/36/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council on the Recognition of Professional Qualifications

Government Regulation on the Accreditation Standards in Higher Education

Higher Education Act 

Strategic Plan for the Scholarly, Scientific, Research, Development, Innovation, Artistic and Other Creative Activities of Higher Education Institutions (2016–2020)

Student assessment

General principles are the same as for a Bachelor’s degree programmes. Further conditions are included in Study and Examination Regulations of higher education institutions (vysoké školy) or faculties. The diploma thesis (diplomová práce) is part of the final state examination (státní závěrečná zkouška).

Legislation and Bibliography:

Higher Education Act

Certification

A Master’s degree programme finishes with a final state examination (státní závěrečná zkouška); the defence of a thesis is its part. Studies are considered to be completed on the day when the corresponding state examination or its last part was taken.

higher education diploma (vysokoškolský diplom) and a supplement to the diploma (dodatek k diplomu) are documents confirming completion of studiesand the right to use the appropriate academic title. The level of education attained is ISCED 747. Higher education institutions (vysoké školy) have the right to award a higher education qualification (diploma) only in accredited study programmes. Accreditation is awarded to the particular higher education institution by the National Accreditation Bureau for Higher Education (Accreditation Bureau) either in a form of an institutional accreditation for an educational area or in the form of an accreditation for a particular study programme. On the basis of an institutional accreditation for an educational area the higher education institution gains a permission to approve its study programmes within the given area itself. For more information, Accreditation and external evaluation in Chapter 11.

An overview of academic titles in Master’s study programmes

ProgrammesTitleAbbreviation
in economy, technical sciences and technology, agriculture, forestry and militaryinženýr (Engineer) Ing.
in architecture inženýr architekt (Engineer of Architecture) Ing. arch.
in art1)magistr umění (Master of Art)MgA.
in other fields (except for medicine, veterinary or hygiene) magistr (Master)Mgr.

Note: Academic titles are used in front of the name.

1) For graduates of Bachelor’s and Master’s programmes in arts who were admitted without having completed upper secondary education with a Maturita examination (střední vzdělání s maturitní zkouškou) or tertiary professional education (vyšší odborné vzdělání), the title is awarded after they have achieved this.

Successful completion of the Master’s degree programme is a prerequisite for admission to a doctoral programme; their graduates obtain the title Ph.D.

Advanced study examination

Apart from this, after being awarded the title magistr, graduates of a Master’s degree programme can sit for an advanced study examination (státní rigorózní zkouška) in the same field. This includes the defence of an advanced study thesis. The title awarded is Doctor in the respective field, so-called “small doctorate” (rigorózum) (Advanced Master Degree). The level of education attained is ISCED 740. Upon completion of the advanced study examination, the higher education institution issues a diploma with indication of the particular higher education institution and the awarded academic title. The higher education institution can set a fee for activities connected with the submission of the application for the examination and the organisation of the examination. Within the accreditation of the Master´s degree programme by the Accreditation Bureau, it is also decided upon the permission of awarding these academic titles. In case of institutional accreditation, such possibility arises from the institutional accreditation for the given educational area. The higher education institution can award such academic titles only if it has the permission for the given educational area to realize at least one Doctoral degree programme. In terms of qualification level, Advanced Master Degree is a Master level qualification. Conditions of an advanced Master proceeding are usually regulated by the internal regulation of the particular higher education institution.

An overview of academic titles – advanced study examination

Advanced study examinationTitleAbbreviation
in lawdoktor práv (Doctor of Law)JUDr.
in humanities, education and social sciencesdoktor filozofie (Doctor of Philosophy)PhDr.
in sciencesdoktor přírodních věd (Doctor of Natural Sciences)RNDr.
in pharmacydoktor farmacie (Doctor of Pharmacy)PharmDr.
in theologydoktor teologie (Doctor of Theology) or licenciát teologie (Licentiate of Theology)ThDr. or ThLic.

Note: Academic titles are used in front of the name.

For more information on recognition of foreign higher education qualifications.

Legislation and Bibliography:

Higher Education Act

Third Cycle (PhD) Programmes

Organisation of doctoral studies

Doctoral degree programmes (ISCED 844) are aimed at scientific research and independent creative activities in the area of research or development, or at independent theoretical and creative activities in the area of fine arts.

The standard length of study is at least three and at most four years. The average duration of doctoral studies is longer; it varies on average between five to six years. Higher education institutions (vysoké školy) set the maximal study length in their internal regulations.

The credit system in doctoral programmes is not being implemented everywhere. The situation is different even within faculties of one higher education institution.

The creation and provision of study programmes is one of the recognised academic rights and freedoms of the higher education institutions. A study programmes is a subject to accreditation which is awarded by the National Accreditation Bureau for Higher Education (Accreditation Bureau) or is approved in an internal process by the higher education institution itself – this is the case when the higher education institution obtains an institutional accreditation for the particular educational area/areas. Study programmes approved by the higher education institution are considered as accredited according to the Higher Education Act. Newly, they are not broken down into study fields. For more information Study programmes in Bachelor.

Studies in the doctoral degree programme proceed according to an individual study plan under the guidance of a supervisor.

At some faculties, students in doctoral programmes are usually obliged to teach a certain number of hours. Scope of the obligation is determined by the higher education institution.

Many doctoral programmes at higher education institutions are carried out in cooperation with the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic following the traditional scientific training in these institutions.

Doctoral degree programmes cannot be offered by non-university higher education institutions.

Legislation and Bibliography:

Higher Education Act

Admission requirements

For admission to a doctoral degree programme, an applicant must have completed the Master’s degree programme (ISCED 747 or 746) and in the field of art, he/she must be awarded also an academic title. The conditions must be published at least four months in advance.

An institution can set a maximum number of students to be admitted.In general, admission to studies at higher education institutions (vysoké školy) is limited primarily by the capacity of each institution. This number of students which will be funded in the academic year is limited at the central level by the amount of money allocated to the school through formula funding. A particular higher education institution decides on the number of students in individual fields and forms of study.

Information on tuition fees is given in the section Fees within public higher education in Chapter 3.

Legislation and Bibliography:

Higher Education Act

Status of doctoral students/candidates

Students in doctoral degree programmes have a status of students. Students’ benefits, however, can be taken advantage of only up to 26 years, the tax abatement up to 28 years of age. A department (thus a higher education institution) may employ the student. Students are often involved in research projects if these are carried out in the particular field at a higher education institution (vysoká škola).

Students of doctoral studies have the same rights for scholarships as students of Bachelor’s and Master’s programmes. They also receive a special doctoral scholarship. This scholarship is paid only to students in an on-site study of the standard length (i.e. the period for which programmes are accredited – 3 or 4 years). As the actual length of study is longer, most students of doctoral studies proceed after a standard period of study to the combined form of study. If students exceed the standard study length, they do not pay any fees. Therefore, most higher education institutions offer on-site and distance or combined form of study. Student’s status does not change. Higher education institutions set the maximum length of study, after which the student is excluded from the study (e.g. at Charles University, it is the standard length of study plus 5 years).

Legislation and Bibliography:

Higher Education Act

Supervision arrangements

Studies within doctoral study programmes proceed according to individual curricula under the guidance of a supervisor. Conditions that students have to fulfil during their study and on its regular completion are set in the individual study plan; they are further determined by the content and the extent of the state doctoral examination and requirements for prescribed knowledge.

Studies within doctoral study programmes are monitored and evaluated by a doctoral studies board appointed in compliance with internal regulations of a higher education institution (vysoké školy) or one of its constituent parts that offers the accredited study programme in question. Higher education institutions or their constituent parts may agree on creating a common board for study programmes in the same area of studies. The chair of the doctoral studies board is the guarantor of the doctoral study programme by voting from among its members.

Legislation and Bibliography:

Higher Education Act

Employability

Higher education institutions (vysoké školy) are highly autonomous in setting the content of their courses. The Government is not allowed to oblige HEIs to include certain forms of education in their programmes. For more information on these issues, on involving employers in the governing bodies of HEIs, career guidance and other general principles.

Unemployment rate of doctoral study graduates, 2005–2018 (data collection in April of the given year)

 20052006200720082009201020112012201320142015201620172018
0–6 months0.51.02.01.91.93.23.32.92.85.03.52.82.01.9
0–12 months0.70.91.51.51.62.62.82.53.94.32.71.81.61.2
12–24 months0.20.10.10.40.30.50.90.51.11.00.70.60.40.2

Source: Database of the SVP PedF UK  Data extracted as of 13 December2018

The Table includes, in contrast to data on unemployment of Bachelor’s and Master’s studies graduates, also data of the first six months after graduation. These data monitor the situation of doctoral graduates in the labour market better, immediately after graduation and also allows (data collection is from April) to include a higher number of doctoral graduates in relation to the average time of study (5.5 years). In contrast to Bachelor’s and Master’s studies, the standardised unemployment rates are not included as the differences are minimal.

Legislation and Bibliography:

Communication of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports (SK23/2015) of 11. 8. 2015, issuing the list of regulated professions in the Czech Republic (2015)

Database of the SVP PedF UK

Directive 2005/36/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council on the Recognition of Professional Qualifications

Higher Education Act

Strategic Plan for the Scholarly, Scientific, Research, Development, Innovation, Artistic and Other Creative Activities of Higher Education Institutions (2016–2020)

Assessment

General principles in performing tests are the same as for the Bachelor’s and Master’s study. ECTS credits are usually not widely used in doctoral programmes.

Requirements that a student of the doctoral study must fulfil are determined by a higher education institution in the form of an individual study plan. For a given course, the higher education institution sets the number of compulsory and compulsorily optional courses which the students must attend. Fulfilment of an individual study plan is subject to regular, usually annual, assessment approved by the doctoral studies board.

Students are expected to focus on scientific research and independent creative activity. It must be clear from the theme of the doctoral thesis that their solution will require student’s independent creative activity in research and development, or independent creative activity in art. 

Legislation and Bibliography:

Higher Education Act

Certification

Study of a doctoral programme finishes with a state doctoral examination and the defence of a thesis, the latter is open to public. At some faculties, it is possible to pass a state doctoral examination, to write and to defend a doctoral thesis in English language, and in some study programmes, this is even required. Studies are considered to be completed on the day when the last part of a state examination is taken.

higher education diploma (vysokoškolský diplom) and a supplement to the diploma (dodatek k diplomu) are documents confirming completion of studiesand the right to use the appropriate academic title. Graduates of doctoral programmes are awarded the academic title “Doctor” – Ph.D. (before 1 September 2016 also “Doctor of Theology” Th.D.). The level of education attained is ISCED 844.

An overview of higher education degrees in doctoral study programmes

ProgrammesTitleAbbreviation
most programmesdoktor (Doctor) Ph.D.

Note: Academic title is used behind the name.

Legislation and Bibliography:

Higher Education Act

Organisational variation

A study programme can have the form of:

  • an on-site (daily) course
  • distance (e.g. e-learning) course (currently not organised at any HEI)
  • a combination of both (so called combined form of study)

As regards the content of these three forms, they are equal. Currently higher education institutions offer all doctoral study programmes in an on-site and a combined form of study (i.e. a combination of on-site and a distance form of study).

Mobility in Higher Education

Student mobility

Admission of foreign students

TERTIARY PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS

Majority of mobilities carried out within the tertiary professional education are included in the section on Pupil and student mobility in early childhood and school education. If a tertiary professional school (vyšší odborná škola) is awarded the Erasmus Charter for Higher Education (ECHE), it can participate in learning mobility of individuals and/or cooperation for innovation and good practices under Erasmus+ Higher Education Programme.

HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS

Czech higher education institutions (vysoké školy) offer study opportunities for foreign students. The Higher Education Act stipulates a general condition for this type of study, namely that applicants must have completed the upper secondary education with an examination equivalent to the Czech Maturita examination (maturitní zkouška). Admission to a master’s degree programme requires proper completion of a bachelor’s degree. Foreign students study under the same rules as Czech students. If they study in the Czech language at a public higher education institution, they do not pay tuition fees (unless they exceed the standard duration of studies by more than one additional year). If they study in a foreign language, the relevant fees are set by the higher education institution. However, a higher education institution may require foreign students to pay a fee for the admission proceedings. Graduates are awarded a Czech diploma corresponding to the study programme completed (Bachelor’s, Master’s, Doctoral).

Czech higher education institutions have the possibility to implement study programmes in cooperation with foreign higher education institutions. The Higher Education Act allows higher education institutions to award graduates who have completed these study programmes a Czech academic degree and, if relevant, also the academic degree of the foreign higher education institution pursuant to legislation applicable in the relevant country. The diploma includes the name of the cooperating foreign higher education institution and, if relevant, it may include the information that the foreign academic degree being awarded is a joint degree that is simultaneously awarded also at the foreign higher education institution.

The number of foreign students enrolled in higher education institutions in the Czech Republic exceeds 40 000 (Statistic Performance Yearbook of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports). Apart from that, additional foreign students come to the Czech Republic within short-term stays.

The Centre for International Cooperation in Education, an allowance organisation of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports, prepares numerous activities presented under the general title “Study in the Czech Republic”, aiming to provide information about the possibilities for studying at higher education institutions in the Czech Republic. These activities include preparation and distribution of information materials, cooperation with Czech embassies and Czech Centres abroad and information services for universities as well as managing a website studyin.cz. The website offers basic information about the Czech Republic, its higher education system, about study and life in the country and provides useful news. It is possible to download there a list of accredited programmes in foreign languages and printed materials in English – Catalogue of Higher Education Institutions, The Education System of the Czech Republic, or the Guide to Studying and Living in the Czech Republic.

Mobility of foreign students takes place within:

  • Offers by higher education institutions
  • European programmes
  • Bilateral, intergovernmental and interministerial agreements
  • Foreign development assistance

Offers by higher education institutions

  • Courses for foreigners
  • Higher education institutions offer specialised paid courses for foreign applicants, such as the one-term programme in East and Central European Studies at the Charles University. After completing the course, students receive a certificate of study (this is not a study programme for which an academic degree is awarded).

European programmes

Higher education institutions admit students for short-term study stays. These study stays are often realised within the Erasmus+ Higher Education Programme. In the academic year 2017/18, 8121 students were admitted for study stays at Czech higher education institutions and tertiary professional schools, 2438 students arrived for work placements in the Czech Republic, overall 10559 students. The figure for study stays includes students of public, state and private higher education institutions and tertiary professional schools, i.e. institutions and schools that were actively involved in Erasmus+. (Source: website naerasmusplus.cz, data as of 31 October 2018)

Admission of foreigners pursuant to bilateral, intergovernmental or interministerial agreements

Each year, the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports offers scholarships to foreign nationals pursuant to bilateral intergovernmental or departmental agreements concluded with a number of countries. Scholarships are awarded to applicants who have been nominated by authorized authorities of given countries.

These scholarships are usually provided for a period ranging from 2 to10 months, depending on the specific agreement negotiated between the Czech government and the government of the given country. Scholarships are intended for students, graduates and doctoral students of higher education institutions, exceptionally also for researchers/ education staff from higher education institutions, who wish to complete a study or research stay at a Czech higher education institution. Scholarship holders may be admitted for study stays where they are enrolled in a study programme or a research stay, i.e. depending on their qualifications and preferences they either attend courses of their choice, or pursue their independent research activities at the host institution. The courses discussed above do not lead to an academic degree. For additional information please see the websites of the Centre for International Cooperation in Education and the websites of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports.

Admission of foreigners as part of foreign development assistance

Within the foreign development cooperation programme, the Czech Government offers scholarships to foreigners from countries receiving development assistance provided by the Czech Republic for standard period of study at public higher education institutions in accredited follow-up Master’s and doctoral programmes, and to attend a Czech language and training course (one-year preparatory course).

Government Scholarships at public higher education institutions are awarded pursuant to a government resolution in a joint project of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The scholarships offered are announced annually via Czech embassies. The Strategy for Granting Government Scholarships for Students from Developing Countries for 2013–2018 was approved by the Government Resolution No 301 of 25 April 2012. New strategy for 2019 – 2024 was approved by the Government Resolution No. 77 of 28 January 2019 and in line with it a new methodology is being prepared.

A limited number of scholarships is also available to students from developing countries who submit their applications to the respective National Commissions for UNESCO.

Additional information about study opportunities in the Czech Republic is available on the websites of the Centre for International Cooperation in Education and the websites of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports or via Czech embassies in the respective countries.

Summer Schools of Slavonic Studies

Every year, courses of Czech language, literature, history and culture are organised (so called Summer Schools of Slavonic Studies) at six public higher education institutions in the Czech Republic (University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice, Masaryk University in Brno, Charles University in Prague, Palacký University in Olomouc, Charles University – Institute for Language and Preparatory Studies in Poděbrady and University of West Bohemia in Pilsen). Foreign students and teachers of Czech and other Slavonic languages predominate among the participants.

Pursuant to bilateral international agreements, the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports (MEYS) offers scholarships for participation in these courses to applicants from countries all over the world. The offer is announced via Czech Embassies. Applicants are selected by authorised bodies of the involved countries, alternatively by embassies of the Czech Republic abroad which submit the nominations to the MEYS by 31 March of the given calendar year. Czech Embassies in the given countries can provide advice and additional information. The scholarship includes free of charge instruction, accommodation, meals and excursions, in case of some countries also an allowance is provided.

In addition to scholarship holders, applicant wishing to cover the participation costs themselves may also register for the courses. In that case, applications shall be submitted to the relevant higher education institution, which will afterwards decide about the admission of the applicant.

Programme to Support Czech Cultural Heritage Abroad

Czech compatriots can enrol via Czech embassies in one- or two-term courses, which mainly focus on instruction of Czech language and literature and on history, ethnology, history of art and possibly theology. The courses usually take place at Faculties of Arts at universities in the Czech Republic. Admitted students receive a scholarship and are entitled to the same accommodation and meals as Czech students. After completing the course they receive a certificate.

Legislation and Bibliography:

Statistical Yearbook – Education. Performance Statistic Indicators

Strategy for Granting Government Scholarships for Students from Developing Countries in 2013–2018

Study stays of Czech students abroad

HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS

Higher education institutions (vysoké školy) offer their students enrolled in Bachelor’s, Master’s and also doctoral degree programmes study/research stays at higher education institutions abroad. Students use opportunities to study at universities abroad on practically all continents. Besides European countries, higher education institutions in North and South America, Asia, Africa and Australia are involved.

Mobility of Czech students takes place within:

  • cooperation between universities or faculties
  • international/development programmes
  • intergovernmental or interministerial agreements
  • research, scientific and other projects

Cooperation between universities or faculties

Interuniversity cooperation is based on bilateral agreements concluded to support student mobility (study stays, study visits, summer language courses).

Interfaculty cooperation is based on an agreement between a faculty of a higher education institution and a foreign university.

These stays may be covered by scholarships, but this is not always the case. It is possible to use support from university or faculty scholarship funds or from the resources of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports (Institutional Development Projects).

International cooperation

Higher education institutions realise international cooperation within programmes such as Erasmus+, CEEPUS (focuses on multilateral cooperation between countries of Central and Eastern Europe), Aktion Czech Republic – Austria (a programme aimed at cooperation in science and research between the Czech Republic and Austria), EEA and Norway Grants. The programmes are both for the Czech students studying abroad and for foreign students from countries which participate in these programmes.

Erasmus+

An important tool for realising cooperation between higher education institutions is the Erasmus+ programme. The programme allows for mobility of students via study stays and practical traineeships (work placements for graduates can also be realised).

Within the Erasmus+ programme, 7176 students were sent abroad in school year 2017/18, of which 5433 students were sent on study stays and 1743 on practical traineeships. The figure for study stays includes those at public, state and private higher education institutions and tertiary professional schools (vyšší odborné školy) that were actively involved in Erasmus+. (Source: website naerasmusplus.cz, data as of 31 October 2018)

The Erasmus+ programme also includes cooperation with countries outside Europe.

CEEPUS

CEEPUS – The Central European Exchange Programme for University Studies (CEEPUS) is an activity aimed at supporting regional cooperation in higher education. The programme is intended for higher education students, including doctoral students and academic staff. Scholarships, both for study stays and practical training (only practical training is guaranteed by the host higher education institution) are offered. Members of the network are Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Moldavia, Montenegro, Czech Republic, Croatia, Hungary, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Poland, Austria, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia and Serbia, on top of that universities in Pristina, Prizren, and Peja – Kosovo also cooperate.

In the Czech Republic the programme is administered by the National CEEPUS Office, which is part of the Centre for International Cooperation in Education. For details on the operation of the programme in the Czech Republic.

AKTION Czech Republic – Austria

AKTION Czech Republic – Austria is a programme promoting bilateral cooperation in education and science. Cooperation between the Czech Republic and Austria is supported. The programme provides scholarships for study and scientific stays and for participation in summer language and professional schools. Besides that, projects aimed at institutional cooperation between educational institutions are supported.

EEA and Norway Grants

Three non-EU member states (Iceland, the Principality of Liechtenstein and the Kingdom of Norway) established the European Economic Area (EEA) Grants. In addition, the Kingdom of Norway established separate grant. These grants are focused also at research and cooperation in higher education. Priority sectors for the programming period 2014 – 2021 have been defined including e.g. Education, in which four activities will be supported – projects of institutional cooperation, mobility projects, VET projects and inclusive education projects. Within the above sector higher education student learning mobility and staff mobility between donor and beneficiary countries is supported. See EEA and Norway Grants on the website of the Centre for International Cooperation in Education.

Visegrad scholarships

The International Visegrad Fund (IVF) was established to promote the development of cooperation and to strengthen mutual ties among Central European countries. One of the activities realised within the fund are Visegrad Scholarships, which enable study in master’s degree programmes and post-graduate studies/research at higher education institutions and research institutions in V4 countries (the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia) and in other participating countries.

V4 Students can study/do research in Visegrad group countries (Intra-Visegrad Scholarships) or in a ‘neighbouring country’ which is not member of the V4: Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Georgia, Macedonia/FYROM, Moldova, Montenegro, Serbia and Ukraine; the same rules apply to universities in Kosovo (Out-going Scholarships).

Scholarships are also offered to applicants from Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Georgia, Kosovo, Macedonia/FYROM, Moldova, Montenegro, Russian Federation, Serbia and Ukraine, the same rules apply to candidates from Kosovo. These allow applicants to study in any of the V4 countries (In-coming Scholarships).

For other activities supported by the International Visegrad Fund.

Also other scholarship are offered via IVF. For more information, see mobilities within IVF.

Intergovernmental/interministerial agreements

The Czech Republic has established cooperation with other countries on the basis of international agreements. These agreements specify e.g. the number of places, the length of stay etc. In case of few countries (Japan, Korea and Germany) it may concern the whole follow-up master’s study (degree mobility). Detailed information on scholarship stays offered on the basis of international agreements is published by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports via the Academic Information Agency (AIA), which is part of the Centre for International Cooperation in Education.

Scholarship stays are allocated in two ways:

  • breakdown of quotas (individual higher education institutions are allocated a certain number of scholarships; students are selected directly by the higher education institution);
  • competition (scholarships are intended for all higher education institutions in the Czech Republic, the AIA organises selection procedures).

Centralised development programmes and Institutional programmes for public higher education institutions

Higher education institutions may also use Centralised development programmes and resources from Institutional programmes as a source for financing student mobility.

Recognition of education and qualifications

Recognition of foreign higher education is regulated by the Higher Education Act. However, in some cases the Convention on the Recognition of Qualifications concerning Higher Education in the European Region which was adopted in Lisbon in 1997 (the Lisbon Convention) takes precedence over the Higher Education Act. This is a situation when the Czech Republic has not signed a bilateral equivalence agreement with a party to the Lisbon Convention. Pursuant to the Lisbon Convention, an application may only be rejected if the degree programmes differ substantially and everything is properly justified. For the Lisbon.

The procedure pursuant to the Higher Education Act is outlined below.

In cases when the Czech Republic is bound by an international agreement with the country in which the foreign higher education institution (vysoká škola) is established and recognised (the Ministry is authorised by the agreement to recognise education), a graduate of a foreign higher education institution may ask the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports (MEYS) to recognise his/her higher education or a part thereof.

If there is no agreement between the countries, the graduate may apply for the recognition of his/her higher education to a public higher education institution which carries out a degree programme with a similar content. The public higher education institution issues a certificate based on the knowledge of the quality of the foreign higher education institution in question or based on the extent of knowledge and skills certified by the higher education qualification. The same applies analogously to individual examinations taken at the higher education institutions abroad, where this is not a joint degree programme with a partner higher education institution.

Decisions on the recognition of higher education and qualification acquired abroad are made by the rector on behalf of the public higher education institution. The documents that are required for recognition include the original or a certified copy of the diploma, report/certificate or a similar document issued by the foreign higher education institution, or alternatively an original or a certified copy of a diploma supplement and supplementary information confirming that the degree programme was carried out by an institution authorised to provide comparable education as well as information on the content of the higher education received abroad. If necessary, a certified translation of the documents is to be attached.

Unless the international agreements states otherwise, the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports or a public higher education institution may require the authenticity of the signatures and stamps on the original documents issued by the foreign higher education institution to be verified by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the country in which the higher education institution that issued the document is based, or by a relevant foreign body and the relevant embassy of the Czech Republic.

In case of doubting the existence of a similar degree programme at higher education institutions in the Czech Republic, the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports (Department of Higher Education) may decide on recognition itself. The Ministry is also the appellate body for rejected applications.

In case of an individual who has been granted international protection in the form of asylum or subsidiary protection in the Czech Republic or any other member state of the European Union, or who – based on the Czech Republic’s international commitments – must be regarded as a refugee or a displaced person or a person in a situation similar to that of refugees, the proof of education and the verification of authenticity may be replaced with an affidavit.

The amendment to the Higher Education Act (2016) newly regulates the conditions for the admission of applicants into a Bachelor’s or a Master’s programme that does not follow a Bachelor’s programme. This concerns applicants who completed upper secondary education abroad. For more information.

Legislation and Bibliography:

Higher Education Act

Lisbon Convention

Academic staff mobility

TERTIARY PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS

Similarly as students, also teachers and other staff of tertiary professional schools (vyšší odborné školy) can participate in activities within the Erasmus+ Programme for Higher Education. The precondition is receiving the Erasmus Charter for Higher Education (ECHE).

HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS

Similarly to student mobility, the international mobility of academic staff of public higher education institutions (vysoké školy) is among the priorities of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports (MEYS) that are set out in the Strategic Plan for the Scholarly, Scientific, Research, Development, Innovation, Artistic and Other Creative Activities of Higher Education Institutions. The mobility of both students and academic staff (short stays, one- or two-term stays, work placements and other forms of international cooperation) shall be supported by additional financing for existing programmes. The measure aims to increase the number of people benefiting from experience gained abroad, to reduce social barriers in accessing mobility programmes and to strengthen the overall internationalisation of Czech higher education.

Mobility within the research activities is also mentioned in the National Research, Development and Innovation Policy of the Czech Republic for 2009–2015 with an outlook to 2020. One of the objectives of this policy is to ensure high-quality human resources to tuitions for 2016–2020. Therefore, the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports shall announce programmes to support researchers (especially doctoral students and young researchers) to complete exchange scholarship at major institutions in Europe and all over the world.

Mobility of academic staff takes place within:

  • Agreements between universities or faculties
  • International cooperation programmes
  • International agreements
  • Research and other projects financed by grants, and programmes focusing on supporting scientific projects

Agreements between universities/faculties

The conclusion of agreements between universities or faculties is fully in the competence of the individual higher education institutions and faculties. Agreements are often concluded on the basis of specific cooperation themes proposals. Sending higher education institution usually contributes to travel expenses, expenses related to the stay are paid by the host institution. Pursuant to international agreements and programmes, higher education institutions also admit foreign academic staff.

International cooperation programmes

Erasmus+

Stays of academic staff are also carried out within the Erasmus+ programme. The programme has several activities aimed at this target group. The main ones are as follows:

  • staff mobility for teaching periods (intended for education staff – academic staff, i.e. employees of higher education institutions who carry out both teaching and scientific, research, development, innovation, artistic or other creative activity) – staff teaches at a foreign higher education institution for a period ranging from 2 days to 2 months;
  • staff mobility for training periods (intended for educational and non-education staff) – professional development at a foreign organisation lasting from 2 days to 2 months aiming to support professional growth of staff;
  • study stays and practical traineeships (available to doctoral students).

Within the Erasmus+ programme, also cooperation with countries outside Europe exists. Therefore, additional activities can be carried out as well.

Erasmus+ allows education staff from the Czech Republic to travel abroad to receive training or teach at a partner higher education institution. Every year, educational and other staff travel from the Czech Republic for teaching or training periods in various European countries, and newly also outside Europe. Similar number of HE staff come to the Czech Republic to teach at Czech higher education institutions.

In the 2017/18 academic year, 1999 members of academic staff were sent abroad on teaching periods within Erasmus+, and additional 1341 left for training periods. However, this figure also includes non-education staff of higher education institutions. Conversely, 1636 academic staff arrived in the Czech Republic for teaching periods, and 1211 tertiary education staff participated in training periods. (Source: website naerasmusplus.cz, data as of 31 October 2018)

EEA and Norway Grants

Three non-EU member states (Iceland, the Principality of Liechtenstein and the Kingdom of Norway) established the European Economic Area (EEA) Grants. In addition, the Kingdom of Norway established a separate grant. The main mission of the projects funded via grants is to reduce social and economic disparities in Europe and to strengthen bilateral contacts and mutual co-operation. In April 2017, the second phase of the “School Cooperation and Scholarship Programme” was completed. In September 2017, a Memorandum of Understanding was signed for the new periods of the European Economic Area (EEA) and Norwegian Funds between the Czech Republic and the donor states of Norway, Liechtenstein and Iceland. In November within the EEA Grants 2014-2021, the Programme Agreement for the programme Education was signed between the Ministry of Finance and the donor states. Four activities are offered within the programme: projects of institutional cooperation, mobility projects, VET projects and inclusive education projects. For more information, see EEA and Norway Grants on the website of the Centre for International Cooperation in Education.

CEEPUS

Activities within CEEPUS – the Central European Exchange Programme for University Studies focus on supporting regional cooperation in higher education. The programme is intended for higher education students, including doctoral students and education staff of higher education institutions. The support is intended for academic staff with a full time contract. Another condition is the necessity to teach at least 6 lessons during 5 working days. The CEEPUS financial contribution is always paid by the host country (the contribution varies depending on the member state of the programme). Travel expenses on stays abroad can be paid by their home higher education institution.

AKTION Czech Republic – Austria

Aktion is a programme aimed at promoting bilateral cooperation in education and science. It supports cooperation between the Czech Republic and Austria. The programme provides scholarships to public higher education institutions for study and scientific stays and for participation in summer language and professional schools. It supports for example projects for institutional cooperation between educational institutions. Academic staff of public higher education institutions can apply for a one-month scholarship that covers all costs. The amount of the monthly scholarship for stays in Austria is EUR 1 040. For a small fee, the Austrian Exchange Service offers the possibility of arranging accommodation at a price of EUR 220 to 470.

Central European Initiative University Network

The Czech Republic is a member state of the University Network of the Central European Initiative (CEI UniNet) which promotes regional cooperation of European higher education institutions, including e.g. student and education staff mobility.

Visegrad Scholarships Programmes

The Visegrad Scholarship Programme offers scholarships for post-graduate study/research which can be realised at higher education institutions or the Academy of Sciences in the V4 countries, or possibly in other countries. For more information about the types of scholarships and the countries in which the stays can take place. The Visegrad Fund also offers other possibilities of cooperation.

Programme to Support Czech Cultural Heritage Abroad

Within the programme to support Czech cultural heritage, the Czech language and literature are taught abroad, especially at universities, at Slavic philology departments at faculties of art. The Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports decides on the number and location for Czech language and literature education abroad. Decisions on the selection of new lectors are made by a committee composed of representatives of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and experts on Czech studies. The teachers of Czech language and literature must have a master’s or doctoral degree, preferably in the Czech language, and practical experience in teaching the Czech language is an advantage. They are usually sent abroad under international agreements. Locations are open across four continents (Europe, Asia, Africa, and America). Additional information can be found on the website of the Centre for International Cooperation in Education.

International agreements

The Czech Republic has international agreements with a number of countries. These are concluded by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports and include an offer of scholarship stays abroad. They specify the number of places, length of stays, requirements for applicants etc. The offer of scholarship stays abroad, which is based on international agreements, is published by the Academic Information Agency (AIA) on its website. The AIA is part of the Centre for International Cooperation in Education.

Centralised development programmes and Institutional programmes for public higher education institutions

Higher education institutions can use centralised development programmes as a source for financing academic staff mobility. Centralised development programmes are announced annually by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports. The focus of the projects must be in line with the Strategic Plan for the Scholarly, Scientific, Research, Development, Innovation, Artistic and Other Creative Activities of Higher Education Institutions; the Strategic Plan includes support for both student and academic staff mobility.

Furthermore, a higher education institution may also receive financial resources from Institutional Development Plans that are announced by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports. As a prerequisite, the higher education institution must create a plan that is in line with the priorities set by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports in its strategic documents.

Scientific cooperation

Many foreign visits of academic staff are carried out within scientific cooperation. These visits are financed by grants aimed at specific research projects. The main grant providers in the Czech Republic are the Czech Science Foundation (GACR), the Technology Agency of the Czech Republic (TACR) and individual ministries.

Czech scientists can also apply for scholarships provided for a specific research project by foreign programmes. For example, the Fulbright Program focuses on cooperation between the U.S. and the Czech Republic. The German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) offers research stays for education staff of the higher education institutions and for scientists.

The Euraxess Czech Republic Service Centre has been set up at the Czech Academy of Sciences to support the mobility of researchers. The centre is part of the EURAXESS European Network of Services Centres and aims to provide the information and services necessary for realising the stays of international researchers in the Czech Republic and also of Czech researchers abroad. A network of regional cooperating points has been created at higher education institutions. The project is supported by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports under the EUPRO programme.

Other possibilities for cooperation – Foundations

Mobility is also supported by some foundations, e.g. travel scholarships for young researchers are included in the annual programmes of some Czech foundations such as the Czech Literary Fund Foundation and the Josef, Marie and Zdeněk Hlávka Fund.

Legislation and Bibliography:

Strategic Plan for the Scholarly, Scientific, Research, Development, Innovation, Artistic and Other Creative Activities of Higher Education Institutions

National Research, Development and Innovation Policy of the Czech Republic 2016–2020

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European Higher Education Organization is a public organization carrying out academic, educational and information activities on higher education in Europe.

The EHEO general plan stresses that:

  • Higher education systems require adequate funding and, as an investment in economic growth, public spending in higher education should be protected.
  • The challenges faced by higher education require more flexible governance and funding systems, which balance greater autonomy for education institutions with accountability to stakeholders.

Thus, EHEO plans:

  • improve academic and scientific interaction of universities;
  • protect the interests of universities;
  • interact more closely with public authorities of European countries;
  • popularize European higher education in the world;
  • develop academic mobility;
  • seek funding for European universities.