Queen’s University Belfast

Queen’s University Belfast (informally Queen’s or QUB) is a public research university in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The university received its charter in 1845 as “Queen’s College, Belfast” and opened four years later.

Queen’s University Belfast is ranked in the top 173 universities in the world (QS World Rankings 2020), with the second highest ranking on the island of Ireland. Queen’s offers academic degrees at various levels and across a broad subject range, with more than 300 degree programmes available. The current president and vice-chancellor is Ian Greer. The annual income of the institution for 2017–18 was £369.2 million of which £91.7 million was from research grants and contracts, with an expenditure of £338.4 million.

Queen’s is a member of the Russell Group of leading research intensive universities, the Association of Commonwealth Universities, the European University Association, Universities UK and Universities Ireland. The university is associated with two Nobel laureates and one Turing Award laureate.

RegionCentral Europe
CountryUnited Kingdom
Established1810
StatusPublic
Students18900
European University Rankings116
Central European University Rankings93
National University Rankings26
Official Websitehttps://www.qub.ac.uk/

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Campus Locations

Queen’s University Belfast, University Road, Belfast, Northern Ireland BT96AT, United Kingdom

European Higher Education Organization is a public organization carrying out academic, educational and information activities on higher education in Europe.

The EHEO general plan stresses that:

  • Higher education systems require adequate funding and, as an investment in economic growth, public spending in higher education should be protected.
  • The challenges faced by higher education require more flexible governance and funding systems, which balance greater autonomy for education institutions with accountability to stakeholders.

Thus, EHEO plans:

  • improve academic and scientific interaction of universities;
  • protect the interests of universities;
  • interact more closely with public authorities of European countries;
  • popularize European higher education in the world;
  • develop academic mobility;
  • seek funding for European universities.